The Pearl of the

 Central Highlands

Colorful mountains

 and craters, formed in a

eruption on the 15th century.

Enjoy a thermal swim

 in the lukewarm

hot spring stream

Surprising and

memorable landscape

Colorful rolling hills

and mountains tinted

by rhylolite minerals

and obsidian post glacial

lava flows

Take a hike in

breathtaking scenery

Warm up in

a natural hot spring

Rhyolite mountains

and expansive lava fields

Highlands of Landmannalaugar –  Day Tour

Feel free to send your request about availability and questions
to: rafn@discoverwildiceland.com
or call:+354 897 2108

Road Map

This is a super trip for people and photographers interested in the highlands of Iceland and volcanic activity. This trip is for those who love the nature and wants to see indescribable landscapes. I welcome you to join me

Hellisheiði Geothermal PlantIt all starts by picking you up at your hotel or place of stay in my Super Jeep Pickup Truck. at 08:00. Pick-up is also possible from Hveragerdi, Selfoss, Hella

We start off from Reykjavík the first thing we see is the Geothermal Power plant Hellisheiði, located in Hengill. This is the largest geothermal power station in the world, and the largest in Iceland. When we have almost pass over the mountain Hellisheiði we will stop at a nice viewing spot and if the weather is good we can see over the South coast of Iceland as well as Vestmannaeyjar.

We will continue our jurney and pass Hveragerði:

Snowy mountains on South IcelandHveragerði is a town and municipality in the south of Iceland located 45 km from Reykjavík. The surrounding area is part of the Hengill central volcano, and is geothermally active and experiences very frequent (usually minor) earthquakes. The town is known for its greenhouses, which are heated by hot water from volcanic hot springs. These springs are the site of occurrence of certain extremophile micro-organisms, that are capable of surviving in extremely hot environments.(C.Michael Hogan. 2010).

As we carry on our driving we will have Ingólfsfjall to our left side and a small cute hill called Kögunarhóll. In the old days the farmers used to walk to the top of Kögunarhóll to speculate about the weather for the next days (I will tell you about how they did it when we are driving). We will go over the bridge Ölfusárbrú and enter the town Selfoss:

SelfossbrúSelfoss is part, and seat, of the municipality Árborg. The Ring Road (Icelandic: Hringvegur) runs through the town on its way between Hveragerði and Hella. It is a centre of commerce and small industries of 6,512 inhabitants (2011), which makes it the largest residential area in South Iceland. Selfoss was settled by Þórir Ásason sometime after 1000; however, the Icelandic sagas mention that Ingólfur Arnarson was here during the winter of 873-74 under the mountain Ingólfsfjall, which is west of the Ölfusá.
In the summer of 1891, due to the lobbying of Tryggvi Gunnarsson, a member of the Alþing, the first suspension bridge was built over the Ölfusá. This was a major undertaking for Icelandic infrastructure. The bridge made the town a logical centre for services for the surrounding agricultural region. The current bridge was built in 1945 after the original structure collapsed.
Slide-4689In 1900 there were only 40 inhabitants, but by 2006 the population had climbed to 6000.
In 1931 the dairy firm Mjólkurbú Flóamanna and general store Kaupfélag Árnesinga were established. These two companies were the main employers in the area for several decades. During World War II the British stationed troops at Selfoss to guard the strategic bridge.
An earthquake with a moment magnitude 6.3 occurred near Selfoss on the afternoon of Thursday 29 May 2008, causing considerable damage to some buildings and roads. The earthquake was felt across southern Iceland, including the capital Reykjavík and the airbase at Keflavik. At least 30 people were injured; however, there were no reports of human deaths. A number of sheep in the Selfoss area were killed

We will continue to drive through the fertile farm lands of southern Iceland before we drive inland and soon the snow-covered peak of Hekla, Iceland’s most famous active volcano, comes into view

Hekla Volcano

Volcano HeklaHekla is 1,491 metres (4,892 ft) high and one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes; over 20 eruptions have occurred in and around the volcano since 874. During the Middle Ages, Europeans called the volcano the “Gateway to Hell“.  Hekla is part of a volcanic ridge, 40 kilometres (25 mi) long. The most active part of this ridge, a fissure about 5.5 km (3.4 mi) long named Heklugjá, is considered to be the volcano Hekla proper. Hekla looks rather like an overturned boat, with its keelbeing a series of craters, two of which are generally the most active. The volcano’s frequent large eruptions have covered much of Iceland with tephra and these layers can be used to date eruptions of Iceland’s other volcanos. 10% of the tephra created in Iceland in the last thousand years has come from Hekla, amounting to 5 km3. The volcano has produced one of the largest volumes oflava of any in the world in the last millennium, around 8 km3. The most recent eruption was relatively short, it started at 18:18 on February 26, 2000 and lasted until March 8. This eruption produced  lava volume of 0.189 km3  and was named “Hringlandshraun”.

Lake and mountain with snowFrom Hekla we continue our drive over a truly rugged mountain track, traverse the unbridged rivers as Rauðfossakvísl and Dalakvísl, past lava fields, more unbridged rivers and explosion craters.
We will stop at Frostastaðaháls and viewFrostastaðavatn (lake) and Jarðfallið (Lava field). Coming down from that hill we enter Jökulgil, where Landmannalaugar are located in the bottom, but before we reach our destination we have to traverse the river Námskvísl.

Natural poolFrom Hekla we continue our drive over a truly rugged mountain track, traverse the unbridged rivers as Rauðfossakvísl and Dalakvísl, past lava fields, more unbridged rivers and explosion craters.
We will stop at Frostastaðaháls and viewFrostastaðavatn (lake) and Jarðfallið (Lava field). Coming down from that hill we enter Jökulgil, where Landmannalaugar are located in the bottom, but before we reach our destination we have to traverse the river Námskvísl.

As we head out from Landmannalaugar, we visit the beautiful crater lake Ljótipollur which literally means ugly pond. I don’t know how it got named this way but I believe it was reverse marketing tactics. The place was formed in 1477 when there was an explosive eruption and is a part of the Veiðivötn volcanic system. The lake has not river inlet or outlet river and is quite deep.
We will also stop at the edge of the crater Hnausapollur (also called Bláhylur (Blue Pool))

Slide-9092On our way home we will drive through the magnificent Þjórsardalur, the valley where Iceland’s longest river Þjórsá, flows. We take a look at Hjálparfoss, meaning the Helping Falls, getting the name from old history when people were traveling south over the desolate Sprengisandur in the highland and got to this lush area that was a help for their horses to graze and recover

From there we head home to our Hotel or Guesthouses with some beautiful pictures and great memories.

It is said that every nature photographer in Iceland goes through a ‘Landmannalaugar-phase’ due to the endless photo ops and the amazing colors.

 

REMEMBER: 
If you want to stop on the way to take pictures.  Then we stop with a smile.

Tour Details:

 

Price:

3rd person is free
Min 2 – Max 3 persons
83.950 ISK  per person
753 USD per person

Pick-up:
In Reykjavík / Reykjanes from hotel or guesthouse around 8:00

Included:
Driver/tour guide

Not included:
Meals, Entrance fees

Lunch can be bought on the way.

Level:
Easy

Duration:
10 – 12 hours.

Dates:
c.a. June – Sept/Oct

NOTE:
Hiking shoes, dress warm because the weather in Iceland can change in matter of minutes. Bring your swimwear and towel if you want to swim at Landmannalaugar natural pond.

 

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